Glossary of Terms

The list below contains definitions of terms most commonly used in BC Student Outcomes.


Glossary

Adult Basic Education (ABE)

Adult Basic Education (ABE) provides upgrading courses that enable students to qualify for vocational, career, or academic programs. ABE courses may also lead to a high school diploma (BC Adult Graduation Diploma). Institutions refer to ABE in many different ways, such as career preparation courses, college/university preparation, developmental programs, and access and career programs.

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Applied programs

Applied programs are designed to lead to employment in a specific field. For the Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes Survey, they include programs in the fields of Business and Management, Education, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Health, Human and Social Sciences, Trades, and Visual and Performing Arts.

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Arts and Sciences programs

Arts and Sciences programs consist of courses in the liberal arts, humanities, and social or physical sciences and may lead to an associate degree or transfer to a baccalaureate program. Former Arts and Sciences students who are not in a baccalaureate program are surveyed under the Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes Survey.

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Baccalaureate programs

Baccalaureate programs are undergraduate programs typically lasting three or four years. Upon program completion, students are awarded a bachelor’s degree. These students are surveyed under the Baccalaureate Graduates Survey (BGS).

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BC CIP Clusters

BC CIP Clusters are subject matter groupings of instructional programs according to the first two digits of the six-digit CIP code.

BC CIP Clusters

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Classification of Instruction Program (CIP) Codes

The Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is a comprehensive taxonomy of programs of instruction based on subject matter. CIP is used by Statistics Canada and is an accepted standard for the classification of post-secondary education programs in Canada.

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Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate programs

These are the instructional programs offered by each institution that participates in the Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes Survey. The programs are standardized into Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes and program areas. They are also assigned standardized codes for program type and credential.

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Eligible students (cohort)

The eligibility criteria for each survey are as follows:

To be eligible for the Apprenticeship Student Outcomes Survey, former students

  • Must have completed the final year of their in-school training.
  • Will be surveyed only for the highest level of a multi-level program (e.g., welding, cook training) they have completed.
  • Must have left their program and not been re-enrolled in the same program (or at the same level for multi-level programs), in the six months preceding the cohort data extraction.

To be eligible for the Baccalaureate Graduates Survey, former students

  • Must have finished an undergraduate degree program at a B.C. public university, college, or institute and been granted their degree in the calendar year two years prior to the survey year.

To be eligible for the Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes Survey, former students

  • Must have successfully completed at least 75 percent of the program requirements if they came from a program that normally takes more than one year to complete.
  • Must have successfully completed the program of study if they came from a program that normally takes a year or less to complete.
  • Must have left their program and not been re-enrolled in the same program in the six months preceding the cohort data extraction.

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Employment Rate

The employment rate is the number of respondents who were working at a job or business at the time of the survey, as a percentage of all respondents.

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English as a Second Language (ESL)

English as a Second Language (ESL) is also referred to as English as an Additional Language (EAL), English Language Training (ELT), English as a Second or Other Language (ESOL), or English Language Learning (ELL). ESL programs provide language instruction and information about Canadian culture, society, and the workplace. These programs are intended for people who need higher levels of English to help them find jobs or enter vocational, career, technical, and academic programs.

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Foundation programs

Foundation programs are pre-apprenticeship programs that provide trainees with the basic knowledge and skills needed for entry into a particular trades occupation. They are typically conducted in a classroom or shop setting and do not involve any significant work-based training component. As a result, trainees do not require an employer/sponsor to participate. These programs offer a linkage to one or more apprenticeship programs and may precede enrolment in a full apprenticeship. They may also provide credit towards apprenticeship training.

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Labour Force

The labour force includes people who are employed as well as those who are looking and available for work at the time of the survey. In 2002, the definition of the labour force in the BC Student Outcomes surveys was changed to align with that of Statistics Canada. Unemployed respondents that were full-time students looking for full-time work at the time they were surveyed are no longer included in the labour force; neither are respondents who stated they were not available for work because they were going to school.

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Occupation

The occupation classification system referenced in Student Outcomes’ publications is the National Occupation Classification (NOC). The NOC is a taxonomy of occupations in the Canadian labour market and is used to assign codes to the occupations former students had at the time of the survey.

More information about the 2011 NOC can be found at: http://noc.esdc.gc.ca/English/home.aspx. The NOC matrix is available at: http://noc.esdc.gc.ca/English/NOC/Matrix2011.aspx.

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Program type

This refers to the distinction made between Applied programs and programs designated as Arts and Sciences.

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Unemployed and Unemployment Rate

Unemployed refers to respondents who were not employed at a job or business at the time of the survey. The unemployment rate is the number of respondents who were unemployed and looking for work as a percentage of respondents in the labour force. (Full-time students looking for full-time work and students who were unavailable for work at the time of the survey are excluded from the labour force.)

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